Why Office Buildings Should Run Like Spaceships

Yodit Stanton quoted in Oct-8-2017 WSJ Article “Why Office Buildings Should Run Like Spaceships”

There have been several articles in the press about sensors used to create a workplace characterized by pervasive monitoring, turning it into a panopticon, a prison where every resident’s activities are subject to surveillance. That is certainly a risk, but it’s driven not by the technology per se but by how management, whether executive management or facilities management, intends to make use of the information.

None of the sensors we deploy for occupancy monitoring do more than count – whether it’s how many people are in a meeting room or if a desk is occupied. What I liked about Christopher Mims approach is that he focused on how sensors can help to make workplaces healthier and more productive for employees.

The entire article is worth reading but here are two quotes that will give you a flavor. First his opening sentence;

“If you have ever yearned to work aboard the Starship Enterprise, take comfort: The newest office buildings have more in common with spaceships than you realize.”

I think this is a much better metaphor for the likely impact of sensors on the workplace when deployed by intelligent and caring executives.

“Scientists have been trying for decades to figure out how to help humans survive long-haul missions in orbit and to Mars. They take into account light levels, temperature, humidity and dozens of other factors including working styles. The biggest difference between that research and what’s happening here on Earth is that office optimization isn’t about survival, but productivity—getting the most out of every worker.”

I would say our approach to office optimization is to enable micro-climates or neighborhoods that allow each employee–and the teams they are members of–to be more productive using evidence based design and a clear understanding of the activities they need to engage in to get their job done. Areas for people who spend a lot of writing may look different than those who spend a lot of time on the phone, and work environments that enable intense ongoing collaboration will be different still.

Over the course of any given day or week an employee may spend different amounts of time in each area. Sensors help you understand what’s being utilized and coupled with ongoing direct communication with employees will allow facilities management and executive to continue to adapt and refine the environments to improve employee health and productivity.

Read full article at https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-office-buildings-should-run-like-spaceships-1507467601

What does project managing sensor deployments involve?

We catch up with Kevin MugadzaProject Manager at OpenSensors

Kevin Mugadza is responsible for a thorough site preparation inspection, off-site staging of the network, deployment, and ongoing maintenance support. Kevin has a decade of experience managing logistics and risks to provide on-time delivery of a fully operational sensor network.

Based on years of experience managing inventory, supply chains and logistics, he sees the following as the top risks for deployment of sensors networks:

  • Site specific risks: gateway/sensor placement for signal quality, ensuring connections with gateway has been established, ensuring gateways connect to cloud
  • Prepare risk – staging to verify design
  • Maintenance risk  – detecting sensors that have failed (e.g. stopped transmitting)
  • Connectivity of network, connectivity from gateway to cloud, deploying – setting up staging, maintenance – keeping the data flowing
  • Scoping process – identify and ensure impact on key KPIs

 

How does a project begin?

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“My involvement begins when the project is signed off and the client has given us the CAD drawings, floor by floor so that an initial site survey can be done.

At the beginning of a project the main thing we look for is mitigating risks and anticipating potential problems so a project can run smoothly. We start with a detailed site survey. The survey let’s us know where best to position the sensors and gateways for maximum signal strength to be recorded.

The next stage is to make sure the client is ready to receive the information when it’s set up. Prepared with a sample kit, we double check it’s powering up and that all sensors are communicating with the gateway.”

What determines where you would put the kit?

“There are a lot of different variables influencing signal strength depending on where you put the kit and these need to be identified so that the data can be gathered securely and precisely. Successful communication between the gateway and the sensors is based on signal strength and ‘signal to noise ratio’ within its LoRa range. We start by centrally positioning a gateway, and then we place a sensor in each of the four farthest corners of the room. From there, you can tell where the maximum strength of signal lies and where it may register as dropping off.”

What affects a signal?

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“It depends on the makeup of the building. Materials, such as metal in the foundations of the buildings, can be one way of influencing the sensor. One of the reasons we use LoRa technology is because it reflects off other buildings so we don’t need a clear path for a good signal.”

OpenSensors does installation in stages, why is that?

“The phased approach is to mitigate against risk. We start off with a small pilot for an early win and to adequately prepare for larger subsequent deployments within the company. Rather than trying to tackle too many things at the same time, having a phased approach makes it easier not only to have a reliable understanding of what you can expect over a period of time, but also how best to manage it. We want to understand what variables there may be in the life cycle of a sensor and whether these differ between each site or over different floors. If a sensor goes down, it needs to be in touch with the structure already in place so that it can be quickly picked up and then dealt with.“

How long does a pilot run for?

“The pilot phase will run from 1 to 3 months. Deployment time is kept to a minimum because we have project kits with pre-configured sensors and gateways ready to go straight from the box. This saves a lot of time and money since we are able to operate onsite with only a small focused team.”

How long does it take to install a sensor?

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“This depends on the type but for desk sensors it only takes about 20 seconds per unit. They can easily be attached under a desk discreetly and are unobtrusive enough not to be noticed. They can just as easily be unattached and moved as and when needed.”

How do you support the existing structure within the company?

“We try to be as frictionless as possible throughout the whole process. That’s why our systems are designed to work independently of a client’s networks so we can do a lot of our support work remotely when we are troubleshooting. It’s important to establish a clearly defined route in order for this to happen. Tickets can be raised by clients and we have a dedicated team to deal quickly with any issues that might arise.

You need a reliable set of data regularly coming in, so keeping sensors online and talking to the gateway is essential.”

What sensors are clients interested in using?

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“The most popular sensors are occupancy monitoring sensors which look at the use of space whether that’s meeting rooms, desks, break-out spaces such as canteens, kitchens, etc. We also use environmental sensors which measure factors such as heat, light, noise, air quality, etc.  We help clients look at the trends within their spaces; how busy that space is, where it is and at what times of the day, days of the week or month is it being used most or least. We also look at what affects where people decide to locate themselves within that space, so if you’ve got a lot of hot desks and find that people are gravitating to particular areas to find a quiet space to work in if they need to concentrate, we will be able to see that.

Desk monitoring comes first and then environmental sensors are phased in after to give you a full overview into what may be affecting people’s comfort and productivity.”

What happens after the initial kit deployment?

“After all sensors and gateways are consistently providing the information needed, we make sure we take time to help the client understand how to use the dashboard and support tools that we have in place to keep their network live so they’re comfortable seeing data coming through and able to interpret it.”  

How do you tell whether a sensor is online or not?heartbeat-2418733__480

 

 

 

 

 

 

“All our sensors are setup to send ‘proof of life’ signals to the gateway at regular intervals wherever they are. This alerts us to any issues quickly and makes sure that everything is as it should be. We help clients manage their assets as comprehensively as they need to

We overlay our visualisations on top of a client’s CAD drawings.

Each sensor can be identified from its unique numbered tag so you can see immediately if a sensor isn’t behaving as it should be. Even if it is in a meeting room, it’s quite easy to narrow down pretty quickly where in the building it is. We get an alert which allows an exact location on the floor plan so that sensors can be managed as efficiently as possible.

Not only does it show us where the sensors are in the building but it also gives us a good overview of their general health. The other thing we can see in the dashboard is battery life.”

How long do sensor batteries last for?

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“There are two different types of sensors; one is plugged directly into the mains whilst the other is battery powered. We check the frequency of messages sent to make sure each sensor is registering at a consistent rate. Most clients require sensors programmed to send a regular ‘heartbeat’ every ten minutes. Based on that, batteries will normally last for 2 years. For greater granularity, it is possible to set the sensor to send data more frequently than every 10 minutes  however, the battery life will then be reduced. For most people, a very comprehensive overview is still possible with a heart beat signal every ten minutes. “

How do you know when a battery needs to be replaced?

“All the sensors have an indicator on the dashboard leading up to low battery life. Every time a sensor sends a ‘heartbeat’, it also sends a battery report making it very easy to see when one needs to be changed well before it stops working. “

When does your involvement with the client end?

“For the life cycle of the project I am there to make sure that our clients find the value in the system installed and that they are happy with the data provided. We are there to help meet their expectations and offer continued support throughout.“

About OpenSensors

OpenSensors has a  multi-disciplinary team to manage the risks for deployment of sensors networks. We have experience with thorough site preparation inspection, off site staging of the network, deployment, and ongoing maintenance support. Our process provides on-time delivery of a fully operational sensor network.

We are getting ready for MIPIM UK!

18-19 October 2017 – Olympia, London 

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Photo by Rob Bye on Unsplash

If you’re coming to MIPIM UK this year, drop by and say hello. You can find us at stand B-31 where we’ll be showcasing examples of OpenSensors’ latest projects. Daniel Hummelsund, our Business Development Representative is giving a presentation on Thursday 19th on “Sensor Data and Evidence Based Design” at 11.00am in the Innovation section – so book your seat!

We’d love to show you the variety of sensors we support. Whether you are interested in measuring the environmental factors, occupancy or air quality of your space, it’s the perfect opportunity to ask us everything you ever wanted to know.

MIPIM is the leading real estate event of the year where major international real estate projects representing all segments of real estate – residential, commercial and industrial – will be showcased.

 

 

Highlights from ThingMonk 2017 “Ten Reasons Why Your IoT Project Will Fail.”

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Yodit Stanton presented “Ten Reasons Why Your IoT Project Will Fail” in a well-attended session at ThingMonk 2017. Here are some highlights.

The first is that successful IoT deployments are going to be transformational on team productivity.

IoT will transform how teams and workgroups operate by making their environments more responsive, how firms operate by allowing them to use their physical infrastructure more efficiently. Sensor networks are a means to greater self-awareness and responsiveness giving not only rooms but buildings and cities more complex and intelligently reactive nervous systems.

At OpenSensors we spend a lot of time thinking and preparing for sensor deployments successfully so that the data they provide enables our customers to manage and utilize the physical infrastructure supporting their employees more efficiently and effectively. Our goal is to create more productive and healthier workplaces. Our business model is not predicated on selling large volumes of sensors but on helping our customers manage IoT networks and the data they provide.

The second is that to design, deploy, provision, and operate an IoT network takes more than a couple of talented data scientists.  

The software industry has spent the last two decades making it very easy to deploy software as a service application: software gliding on abstract virtual environments that have become friction free. IoT is not SaaS: you cannot ignore the physical nature of IoT: and with that physicality comes the need to manage inventory, logistics, and supply chains. Because many networks contain new components or new software and we will combine a thorough site preparation inspection with an off site staging of the network to simplify trouble shooting and ensure on-time delivery of a fully functional IoT network.

It takes a multi-discipliinary team of complementary experts who collaborate and hold each other accountable. You need hardware people, software people, networking specialists, QA people, project managers, and people skilled in managing supply chains and logistics. OpenSensors has assembled a multi-disciplinary team because we are promising the delivery of an operational network composed of complex and rapidly evolving hardware and software components.