Event: Show and Tell of Workplace Sensors

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If you managed to join us last week at Unilever’s impressive London HQ, you will have seen demonstrations from us and our partners in the practical uses for sensors within Workspaces. It was a perfect opportunity to let people see and feel in real terms, different types of sensors from environmental, occupancy and air quality sensing.

Nate Barney and John Chang from Unilever have been smart in their approach to adoption of new technology and shared their approach with attendees. Cornerstones of their strategy include cloud first adoption, choosing vendors that have open APIs to encourage interoperability and understanding all systems should integrate via their analytics layer. Our guests Alex Storey from Disruptive Technologies and Bruno Beloff from South Coast Science introduced us to the sensor innovations they are leading the industry in and both gave informative presentations.

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Disruptive Technologies’ sensors although small – the size of scrabble squares, have an impressive 15 year battery life. We are excited about how disruptive technologies’ sensors are going to change asset monitoring. If you can deploy sensors easily to know when machinery is being used, predicting it’s maintenance cycles and the headline dreams of industrial IoT are suddenly possible!

Bruno brought an example of one of his environmental sensors and gave a fascinating live demo measuring the CO2 in the room – especially disconcerting when it accurately measured the carbon monoxide from a smoker’s breath. South Coast Science have been a partner to OpenSensors for a number of years. Their Air Quality sensors focus on measuring gasses and particulates extremely accurately, these sensors are being adopted by Landlords and Occupiers who are working to meet the Well building standard. In putting sensors not only indoors but also by HVAC vents, building managers are able to monitor the performance of HVAC systems. Questions like ‘When should fresh air be circulated’, ‘Is the HVAC system making the air quality better or worse’ become easier to answer.

Daniel Hummelsund and Kevin Mugadza from OpenSensors also gave insight into the way we approach workspace deployments and our ethos on interoperapility of systems, unsurprisingly we strongly feel that new sensor systems deployed within a building context should ‘talk’ to existing systems and work to augment the workflows of the different people charged with managing the space. Daniel gave information around reports people like to see, how data is analysed in both spatial and time series view. Kevin deep dived into the practical realities of project managing sensors deployments. The team approach these deployments in a methodical way as the complexity of IoT is in getting sensors, networks, software and data layers to work seamless in usually complex environments.

After a lively Q and A and there was an opportunity for networking where guests could enjoy cold drinks on an extremely hot day and got the chance to mingle with other attendees. Thanks to everyone who came and made it such a success. We look forward to the next one in the Autumn.

Path to Smart Buildings

Whether you are a building manager planning efficient space usage or an architect looking to design state-of-the-art buildings, we have broken down the steps to get you to your desired end goal. IoT planning should start with the business needs, of course, and quickly moves from the component layer all the way up to the application layer. We need to figure out what core data should be gathered and ways to effectively leverage that data. These IoT solutions require an end-to-end or device-to-cloud view.

A Phased implementation approach works best.

We have found that the most successful IoT projects follow a phased implementation approach: Design Phase, Proof of Concept, Pilot, and Deployment. The design phase asks questions such as which sensors, who will be installing and maintaining the sensors. For Proof of Concept, a lab evaluation should include hooking up 5-8 sensors all the way through a gateway to data collection in the cloud. This will give enough real data to verify that the queries and the analytics are feasible. The Pilot Phase ensures that the sensors work at scale and that the gateway configuration has been made easy for the deployment specialists. A pilot phase should be about 40 sensors depending on the density of the sensors. At this point, you can scale up to the number of sensors and the bandwidth required for full deployment.

OpenSensors’ Deployments

We have built hardware, installation and network provider partnerships and relationships to help customers get rollouts live efficiently. Either roll out your own network or we will put you in touch with your local sensor installation specialist to take care of the install and maintenance. We are working with customers and the community to understand what is required at each level for your IoT solution and can ease development and integration issues.

Savvy Building Managers Use Sensors to Reduce Operating Expenses

Sensor networks are emerging as a mission critical method for offices and commercial spaces to save money. Offices and commercial spaces are undergoing a smart transformation by connecting and linking HVAC, lighting, environmental sensors, security, and safety equipment. Building and facilities managers are also installing utilization sensors to manage their spaces more efficiently.

Main benefits of data driven buildings * Operational efficiency * Use data for better design * Better workspace experience for employees

Changing workforce

Recently we helped a company design a prototype of a desk sensor monitoring system. Because so many of their people were working from home they wanted to accurately measure the peak demand during the day to see if they could save 10-20% of their desk space. Goals for the system were: * Monitor desk occupancy anonymously. * Minimize installation and deployment costs: rely on solutions that were simple enough that existing non-expert personnel could be trained to deploy. * Minimize day-to-day maintenance and deployment: this drove strategies for long battery life among others. * Design a deployment process that ensured install team could easily add sensor location metadata to allow for rich reporting and analysis once IoT sensor network was operational. * Limit the IT resources needed for deployment

The phased approach works best

First, we looked at many sensors, evaluating quality, signal-to-noise ratio and power consumption. It’s always a good idea to get a handful of different types of sensors and try them out in a very small scale. We chose an infrared red sensor with good battery life-time and a single LoRa gateway that could support all the floors and provide connection to the cloud.

Next we did a full end-to-end test, where we hooked up 5-10 sensors up completely to a cloud infrastructure all the way through the connectivity gateway. Now we had real data flowing into the infrastructure and could verify that the queries and analytics were feasible. This step just makes sure everything works as planned and you will get all the data that you will need.

Once you’re happy with the proof of concept phase, it is time for the real pilot phase. Instead of having just a handful of working sensors, now you’ll hook up an entire floor or a street or whatever your use case might be. It should be somewhere between thirty, forty, maybe up to a hundred sensors. At this point you can ensure that the sensors work at scale and the gateway can handle the load. Typically we see customers running these for a month or two to get a good feel for how the sensors will perform in a production situation.

After the pilot phase, you should have enough data to verify network performance and your choices for sensors and gateways. Now you can plan the full deployment in detail. It’s been our experience, based on a number of customer installations, that the most successful IoT networks follow these steps in a phased implementation approach.

The technology at the silicon, software, and system level continues to evolve rapidly and our aim is to reduce the time to go live and minimise risk. The internet of things is a nebulous term that includes quite a lot of specialised skillsets such as sensor manufacturing, network design, data analysis, etc.

In order to make projects successful, we have taken the approach of building many hardware, installation and network provider partnerships, and relationships to help customers succeed as opposed to trying to do it all ourselves. We have been working with customers to develop methods to lower the sensor density and in turn lower the cost of projects whilst still getting comparable accuracy.

Contact us if you would like assistance on sensor selection, network design, or planning a proof of concept deployment.