Roundup of the Best Workplace Trends Blogs

Blogs are a great way to keep up with the fast changing developments in workspaces. From sensors and software to IoT to real estate, here is a round-up of are some of our current favorite blogs:

Workplace Insight Workplace Insight is a great source of news and information about the design and management of workplaces. Mark Eltringham and his team offer interesting insights into workplace design and management issues.

Memoori Memoori provides thought provoking information and insights on smart buildings.

Dwell Magazine We love this stylish and innovative Magazine, the Workplace & Office section is a special favorite.

Here are a couple of favorite IoT and Smart Building blogs that keep us informed on the latest technology and innovation trends too;

Have a blog you think we should include? Let us know, we’d love to check it out!

The Good Sensor

On a daily basis our customers and community ask us to recommend a sensor provider to buy from, you should ping me on hello@opensensors.io if you want us to recommend your sensor. Often the requirement is vague, “I need an air quality sensor to put on my street for $100?” or “What sensors shall I use to understand my space usage?”. My process of assessment has grown more refined over time because if the sensors we recommend are unsuitable or unusable our company’s reputation is also on the line by association.

So we have come up with our own unscientific way to rate the quality of a sensor that should be applied simply. Most large scale sensor rollout projects of 1K or more often have these requirements as well. It’s possible that sensor providers that don’t rate highly using our criteria produce good sensors but getting the below right takes iteration and discipline in design and the likelihood is that the provider will a higher chance of being able to deliver.

Battery life If a sensor is battery powered, the typical expected life of battery should be clearly stated. Buyers will often want some explanation of what typical means for your sensor i.e. if it’s a PIR sensor have you calculated battery life based on being triggered once a day? The last thing your customers wants to do is invest in a lot of sensors, plus the cost of installation in order to find out that the battery life is only % of what they expected as it will still cost them a lot of money to rip them out and return them.

Bonus point for sensors that publish their battery status as standard so that the sensor owners can have some warning before changing.

Heartbeats

Sensors should tell people whether they are still alive or not periodically. Depending on your battery and connectivity constraints, this can vary, the important thing is that the buyer should not find out a bunch of devices are not working because they haven’t been heard from in days or weeks. Top tip; Heartbeats every 10-60 minutes when possible is sufficient, anymore and it ceases to be informative.

Installation and maintenance procedure

In non consumer environments, the people installing and maintaining sensors are often not the technical design firms or manufacturers. Does your device clearly tell people how to install it, do you have helper applications so that they don’t have to configure firmware? We are working on some solutions for this but more on this later; hint it’s all about enabling people to install sensors efficiently and a non technical installer being able to walk away knowing that the device has joined the network correctly. Does your sensor come with mounting and fittings?

Do people have to unscrew the casing to change batteries? Have you tested this with people and verified it?

 Data Quality

Quality in my definition means, is the data from your sensor easily understandable for someone that doesn’t know your domain. The reality is that often manufacturers pass on the analogue value of the particular sensor and that is too low of an abstraction for most people trying to read it. Battery voltage is a good example, during its life an AA battery will go from 1.5v to about 0.8v, but it follows a curve specific to the device and the battery. Understanding how this maps to a percentage or days of life is often complex. If it’s not possible to do much conversions or processing on your sensor or gateway, perhaps a handy explainer when people buy your device making them understand what the data means.

Support

Please state clear terms for warranties and return procedures to protect your consumers. Consumer protection should naturally apply.

Finally developing high quality hardware is hard, I am always amazed at the skill and dedication it takes when hardware designers and engineers take an idea and get it to manufacturing stage. We try to manage the community’s expectations on sensors they should buy vs the attitude of ‘just throw around cheap sensors’. It would be better in terms of environmental sustainability and user experience to get into the habit of doing more with less sensor density. For more on this, see Dr Boris Adryan’s excellent blog post

I have purposefully not mentioned security in this post as security assessments come with a lot of complexity, will aim to write up on this sometime soon.

Many Thanks to Toby Jaffey for editing.

Path to Smart Buildings

Whether you are a building manager planning efficient space usage or an architect looking to design state-of-the-art buildings, we have broken down the steps to get you to your desired end goal. IoT planning should start with the business needs, of course, and quickly moves from the component layer all the way up to the application layer. We need to figure out what core data should be gathered and ways to effectively leverage that data. These IoT solutions require an end-to-end or device-to-cloud view.

A Phased implementation approach works best.

We have found that the most successful IoT projects follow a phased implementation approach: Design Phase, Proof of Concept, Pilot, and Deployment. The design phase asks questions such as which sensors, who will be installing and maintaining the sensors. For Proof of Concept, a lab evaluation should include hooking up 5-8 sensors all the way through a gateway to data collection in the cloud. This will give enough real data to verify that the queries and the analytics are feasible. The Pilot Phase ensures that the sensors work at scale and that the gateway configuration has been made easy for the deployment specialists. A pilot phase should be about 40 sensors depending on the density of the sensors. At this point, you can scale up to the number of sensors and the bandwidth required for full deployment.

OpenSensors’ Deployments

We have built hardware, installation and network provider partnerships and relationships to help customers get rollouts live efficiently. Either roll out your own network or we will put you in touch with your local sensor installation specialist to take care of the install and maintenance. We are working with customers and the community to understand what is required at each level for your IoT solution and can ease development and integration issues.

Getting to Grips With IoT Network Technologies

How sensors communicate with the internet is a fundamental consideration when conceiving of a connected project. There are many different ways to connect your sensors to the web, but how to know which are best for your project?

Having just spent the better part of a week researching these new network technologies, this brief guide outlines the key aspects to focus on for an optimal IoT deployment:

Advanced radio technology

  • Deep indoor performance – networks utilising sub-GHz ISM (industrial-scientific-medical) frequency bands such as LoRaWAN, NWave and Sigfox are able to penetrate the core of large structures and even subsurface deployments.
  • Location aware networking – a variety of networks are able to track remote sensors even without the use of embedded GPS modules. Supporting sensors moving between hubs – with advanced handoff procedures and innovative network topologies mobile sensors can move around an area and remain in contact with core infrastructure without disrupting data transmission. Intelligent node handoff is also crucial for reducing packet loss, if the connection to one hub is hampered by passing through particularly chatty radiowaves, the node can switch to a better placed hub to relay it’s crucial payload.
  • Interference resistance – the capability of a network to cleave through radio traffic and interference that would ordinarily risk data loss.

Low energy profiling

  • Device modes – LoRaWAN is a great case and point with three classes of edge node: the first, Class A, allows a brief downlink window after each uplink upload i.e after having sent a message, the sensor listens in for new instructions; a Class A node appoints a scheduled downlink slot, the device checks in at a certain point; and the last, Class C type nodes, listen for downlink messages from LoRaWAN hubs at all times. The latter burns considerably more power.
  • Asynchronous communication – this enables sensors to communicate data in dribs and drabs where possible, services do not need to wait for eachother thereby reducing power consumption.
  • Adaptive data rates (ADR) – depending on the quality of signal and attenuation, modern networks are able to dynamically allocate data rate depending on interference, distance to hub etc. This delivers real scalability benefits, frees up space on the radio spectrum (spectrum optimisation) and improves overall network reliability.

security

  • Authentication – maintains data integrity by ensuring the sensor which is publishing that mission critical data really is that sensor and not an impostor node. Ensures information privacy.
  • End to end encryption (E2E) – prevents tampering and maintains system integrity.
  • Integrated security – good network security avoids potential breaches and doesn’t place the onus on costly, heavily encrypted message payloads.
  • Secure management of security keys – either written remotely on the initial install or embedded at manufacture, security keys are fundamental to system security. ZigBee’s recent security issue shows how not to manage security keys, by sending them unencrypted over-the-air to devices on an initial install.
  • Receipt acknowledgement – ensures mission critical data is confirmed received by network or device.

Advanced network design

  • Full bidirectional comms – enables over the air (OTA) updates, enabling operators to push new firmware or system updates to thousands of remotely deployed sparse sensors at the push of a button. This is critical to a dynamic and responsive network. As with device modes mentioned previously, bidirectionality allows deployed devices to function as actuators and take action (close a gate, set off a fire alarm etc) rather than just one-way sensors publishing to a server.
  • Embedded scalability and consistent QoS – as load increases on a network so too does the capacity of the network. This takes the form of adaptive data rates, prevention of packet loss by interference and channel-blocking, the ability to deploy over-the-air updates and ensuring the capability to add nodes, hubs and maintain existing assets without impacting on overall network service, perhaps through automatic adaptation.

There are also a number of legal, cost, market and power focused aspects worth considering that I shall not cover here. But, critically, it’s worth mentioning that the majority of these technologies operate on ISM (industrial – scientific – medical) frequency bands, and as a result are unlicensed. These bands are regulated and there are rules, however anyone operating on these bands can do so without purchasing a license. Notably, you don’t have sole ownership of a slice of the spectrum, you don’t get exclusive access. Therefore, with a variety of other vendors blasting away across the radio waves, these technologies encounter significantly more interference than the licensed spectrum. However, the new networks, LoRa, Sigfox, NWave etc are based on protocols and technologies designed to better sort through this noisy environment, grab a channel and send a message.

Understanding that the airwaves are a chaotic mess underlines the importance placed on features such as adaptive data rates, node handoff and power saving methods such as asynchronous communication. Wired networks do not have to consider such things. But for most it’s not just a case of who shouts loudest wins. The majority of wireless protocols ‘play nice’ opting for a polite “listen, then talk” approach, waiting for a free slot in the airwaves before sending their message.

Some protocols such as Sigfox forego such niceties and adopt a shout loud, shout longer approach, broadcasting without listening. A typical LoRaWAN payload takes a fraction of a second to transmit, Sigfox by comparison sends messages 3-4 seconds in length. However, if you just broadcast without listening, Sigfox must therefore operate with severe cycle duty limitations, which translate into a limited number of messages sent per device per day and severe data rate limitations.

These choices also translate into varying costs, and critically, into battery life limitations and gains, the crux of any remote deployment.

See this link for a matrix of the major technologies currently vying for network domination.